Breads,  Nutrition,  Recipes

Pumpkin Tea Biscuits Using Jaggery

It’s funny for someone who has never really cared for pumpkin, I’ve been baking with it quite a bit lately. 🙂   A week ago there was a little bit of pumpkin puree left over from a batch of pumpkin granola I had made, recipe link right here.   So instead of using the leftover puree in waffles I created a recipe where I could use my latest new ingredient obsession…jaggery.   What is jaggery?  Well if you haven’t heard of it before,  I’m looking so forward to telling you!

I’ll be discussing what jaggery is, the benefits of it, how to use it and at the end there will be a delicious recipe using both jaggery and pumpkin.

What Is Jaggery?

Jaggery also known as “gur” is a unrefined sugar made from sugar cane or date palm.   Seventy percent of the production of jaggery comes from India.  However this type of sugar is used all over in African, Asian, Latin American and Caribbean countries.   The preparation of jaggery is basically a 3 step process.  The first step is extracting the juice from the sugar cane.  The second step is to allow the juice to sit so the sediment falls to the bottom.   Which leads to step three, all the clear liquid from the second step is strained and boiled in a large flat bottomed pan.  The jaggery is then boiled to remove impurities and to produce a yellow to dark yellow thick paste.  After the boiling process it’s transferred to molds and cooled.

The Benefits of Jaggery.

All sugars should be consumed in moderation.  And jaggery is no exception.  However unlike refined white sugar, jaggery has some benefits which should not be overlooked.   Jaggery releases energy slower than regular sugar.  Because of a slower release there’s not an immediate spike in the blood sugar.  Unlike the empty calories of refined sugar, jaggery has minerals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and potassium.  It even has trace properties of protein.

In India jaggery is known to be good for digestive health and is normally eaten after meals to help with digestion.  Jaggery is also know as a detoxifier in India and is used to reduce harmful toxins in the body.

The Best Way To Use Jaggery.

In order to know how to use jaggery let’s first talk about where to purchase it.  Jaggery can be purchased in most international or Asian markets.  I found mine in an India market near me.  You can also order jaggery online.  To use jaggery in baking, it has to be broken down from it’s molded shape.  It can be grated or shaved into tiny pieces to mix into a batter.  Jaggery is also sold in powder form which makes it easier to use and doesn’t have to be broken down.

Jaggery is not a sweetener which can easily be substituted one for one with sugar.  The reason is due to the inconsistency of the moisture level of jaggery.  Some jaggery can be more moist than others causing the baked item to be softer.  The way to determin the moisture level of jaggery is the softer the jaggery the more moisture in the finished baked product, the harder the jaggery the more crisp the baked item will be.

Because jaggery has a great molasses like flavor, it’s great to use as a sweetener for hot cereals, apple pie filling, quick breads, pancakes, waffles and these tea biscuits right here.

Using Jaggery In A Recipe.

To use jaggery in my tea biscuit recipe I shaved slivers of the jaggery and finely cut it to make granules that were not too fine.  I wanted there to be pockets of jaggery in the biscuits so when it’s bitten into you could taste the crystallization of the jaggery.  I found that pumpkin blends very well with the flavor of jaggery.  In this tea biscuit recipe pumpkin is used, however sweet potato would work out very well.   I plan on making banana and chocolate flavored tea biscuits to see how the jaggery flavors work on those flavors.  So look for those versions to come shortly.

The Recipe

You’ll find this recipe easy to make.  The biscuits are easy to digest due to the einkorn flour, spices  and jaggery. And the most delightful part of the biscuit is when you bite into one and you can taste the crystallized pieces of jaggery throughout.  It’s basically the perfect mid morning or afternoon snack!

 

Spicy Pumpkin Tea Biscuits

 

AuthorDesireeCategory, , DifficultyBeginner

These pumpkin tea biscuits are a perfect match for tea. The biscuits are soft, a little dense and filled with pumpkin, spices and the flavor of jaggery.

Prep Time20 minsCook Time20 minsTotal Time40 mins

 2 cups einkorn flour
  cup heaped with pumpkin puree
 ½ cup of grated or finely chopped jaggery
 1 flaxseed egg (1 Tablespoon of flaxseed & 3 Tablespoons of filtered water)
 1 small package of ghee (20 grams) or 1 and 1/2 Tablespoon of ghee
 ½ tsp baking soda
 ½ tsp ginger
 ½ tsp cinnamon
 ¼ tsp cloves

1

To prepare to make the tea biscuits. Place all the dry ingredients in one bowl. Flour, spices and baking soda.

2

Take some jaggery, shave and finely chop to make a 1/2 cup of sweetener for the biscuits.

3

Mix the shaved jaggery and ghee together till it comes together.

4

To the jaggery add the flaxseed egg and pumpkin and mix together. Pour the pumpkin mixture into the flour mixture and combine together.

5

Once combined with a spoon your dough will be scraggly like this. Take you hands and need the dough till it comes together to form a ball.

6

7

Take a plastic bag or plastic wrap and wrap or place the dough into a bag. Sit the dough in the refrigerator for about an hour. This will allow the dough to rest and be easy to cut into shapes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
8

Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper by lining the baking sheet with the paper.

9

Remove the dough out of the fridge. Roll the dough out to about a 1/2 inch thick. Cut out shapes. I used teapot cookie cutters. But you can use any shape you desire. Just remember the size of the cutter might effect the number of tea biscuits you end up with.

I ended up with 14 tea biscuits.

10

11

Bake for 12 to 15 minutes. You will know they are done because they will rise and look golden brown. Let cool on a wire rack and they are ready to eat!

12

13

These biscuits are soft and you can taste the pockets of crystallized pieces of jaggery through out the biscuit. They make an excellent accompaniment to tea and coffee!

Store any leftover tea biscuits in a tightly sealed container and they will store well for 4 to 5 days.

Ingredients

 2 cups einkorn flour
  cup heaped with pumpkin puree
 ½ cup of grated or finely chopped jaggery
 1 flaxseed egg (1 Tablespoon of flaxseed & 3 Tablespoons of filtered water)
 1 small package of ghee (20 grams) or 1 and 1/2 Tablespoon of ghee
 ½ tsp baking soda
 ½ tsp ginger
 ½ tsp cinnamon
 ¼ tsp cloves

Directions

1

To prepare to make the tea biscuits. Place all the dry ingredients in one bowl. Flour, spices and baking soda.

2

Take some jaggery, shave and finely chop to make a 1/2 cup of sweetener for the biscuits.

3

Mix the shaved jaggery and ghee together till it comes together.

4

To the jaggery add the flaxseed egg and pumpkin and mix together. Pour the pumpkin mixture into the flour mixture and combine together.

5

Once combined with a spoon your dough will be scraggly like this. Take you hands and need the dough till it comes together to form a ball.

6

7

Take a plastic bag or plastic wrap and wrap or place the dough into a bag. Sit the dough in the refrigerator for about an hour. This will allow the dough to rest and be easy to cut into shapes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
8

Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper by lining the baking sheet with the paper.

9

Remove the dough out of the fridge. Roll the dough out to about a 1/2 inch thick. Cut out shapes. I used teapot cookie cutters. But you can use any shape you desire. Just remember the size of the cutter might effect the number of tea biscuits you end up with.

I ended up with 14 tea biscuits.

10

11

Bake for 12 to 15 minutes. You will know they are done because they will rise and look golden brown. Let cool on a wire rack and they are ready to eat!

12

13

These biscuits are soft and you can taste the pockets of crystallized pieces of jaggery through out the biscuit. They make an excellent accompaniment to tea and coffee!

Store any leftover tea biscuits in a tightly sealed container and they will store well for 4 to 5 days.
Spicy Pumpkin Tea Biscuits

 

 

 

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaggery

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/jaggery#section1

https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/what-is-jaggery-gur-and-how-is-it-made-1766027

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